Son, you've got a condition
13

roselerner:

So, just watched “The Greek Interpreter,” and they changed the awesome ending where Holmes fails to catch the villains and they get away with abducting the girl and leaving the country with her, and then

"Months afterwards a curious newspaper cutting reached us from Buda-Pesth. It told how two Englishmen who had been travelling with a woman had met with a tragic end. They had each been stabbed, it seems, and the Hungarian police were of opinion that they had quarrelled and had inflicted mortal injuries upon each other. Holmes, however, is, I fancy, of a different way of thinking, and he holds to this day that, if one could find the Grecian girl, one might learn how the wrongs of herself and her brother came to be avenged."

Awesome, right?

And they changed it to a weird train chase ending with Holmes and Watson and Mycroft catching the bad guys and the Greek girl being like “I loved that man! I loved him and I hated him! I would totally have married him even though he totally murdered my brother!” and Holmes saying viciously about her, “It is not a crime to have a cold heart and not a drop of compassion!”

It’s always sad when an adaptation of a Victorian text is MORE sexist than the original.

This kind of thing is always so disappointing :\

3
[Saxe-Coburg Square] was a poky, little, shabby-genteel place, where four lines of dingy two-storied brick houses looked out into a small railed-in enclosure, where a lawn of weedy grass and a few clumps of faded laurel-bushes made a hard fight against a smoke-laden and uncongenial atmosphere.
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allieinarden:

I’m having to read 1 Henry IV for school and my pulse quickened when I hit that fantastic line favored by Conan Doyle, “The game is afoot.”

But then I started wondering how Holmes knows so many Shakespeare quotes, anyway, when he’s established in the first story to have zero knowledge of literature.

So, like a true Sherlockian, I have concluded that Watson was a Shakespeare fanboy who forced his friend into his fandom and ended up bitterly regretting it when Holmes started leaping into his room at night and shouting things like, "The game is afoot"

"whyyyyyyyyy did I ever take you to see that play"

Well, of course. ;) He also probably taught him about all those random writers and philosophers that Holmes keeps throwing around later on, because every time Watson would start passionately quoting shit like he did at the end of A Study In Scarlet, Holmes would ask him what he’s on about and Watson would have to explain the reference, until Holmes got sucked in. The way people nowadays get sucked into Star Wars for the quotes.

96

allieinarden:

"Detection is, or ought to be, an exact science, and should be treated in the same cold and unemotional manner. You have attempted to tinge it with romanticism, which produces much the same effect as if you worked a love-story or an elopement into the fifth proposition of Euclid."

- Sherlock Holmes, critiquing Watson’s write-up of the Jefferson Hope case

"How sweet the morning air is! See how that one little cloud floats like a pink feather from some gigantic flamingo."

- Sherlock Holmes, like fifty pages later

#you’re just jealous because Watson is so much better at metaphors than you

9

The Sign of Four

    Holmes: Romance and detective work are incompatible.
    Watson: Oh YEAH? [marries their very next client]
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anachrophobian:

bakerstreetbabes:

boyinthemachine:

Okay, by just looking at the artwork I deduce that all Holmes and Watson are doing 24/7 is basically sitting around in chairs while judging everything (unless they get up to judge more ppl).

I mean, seriously:

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even each other

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DYING.

that’s, umm… quite accurate, actually.

200143

This is the best line in almost any TV series ever but you really only understand the enormity and profundity of it if you are familiar with the whole show’s mythology and it’s just so beautiful and I was in the bath and I cried.

(Source: branstarks)

13
Hum! You still smoke the Arcadia mixture of your bachelor days, then! There’s no mistaking that fluffy ash upon your coat. It’s easy to tell that you have been accustomed to wear a uniform, Watson. You’ll never pass as a pure-bred civilian as long as you keep that habit of carrying your handkerchief in your sleeve. Could you put me up tonight?

Sherlock Holmes in “The Crooked Man,” by Arthur Conan Doyle.

For some context, this is “a few months after my marriage.” So like, Watson’s bachelor days were EXTREMELY recent. Also I love that they’ve known each other for YEARS at this point, Holmes isn’t really even deducing, he’s probably commented on Watson’s handkerchief habit before, it’s just, like, an affectionate greeting/compliment. Since about 80% of Holmes’s speech is deduction, it’s how he expresses a lot of his emotions. One of my favorite Holmes quirks! (“Elementary” is great at using that I think.)

Also how hot is Watson? SO HOT.

(via roselerner)

#If Holmes just listed all the stuff he loves about Watson he could go on FOREVER, #'I love that indentation on his third right knuckle that indicates blah blah blah'.

5420

gilliankillingmewithboobs:

Mulder, where are you going?

(STARES INTO THE DISTANCE) is definitely my favorite.

(Source: iheartthexfiles)

13

allieinarden:

Before I attempt to participate in Canon Fodder Friday, let me just say that I have never once been able to keep a straight face during Holmes’ monologue in the opening paragraph of “A Case of Identity”:

"…If we could fly out of that window hand in hand, hover over this great city, gently remove the roofs, and peep in at the queer things which are going on, the strange coincidences, the plannings, the cross-purposes, the wonderful chains of events, working through generations, and leading to the most outrè results, it would make all fiction with its conventionalities and foreseen conclusions most stale and unprofitable.”

"Watson, why are you always romanticizing my cases, you make everything sound ridiculous."

"Watson, you know what would be great, if we could fly out the window holding hands and start gently removing people’s roofs."

Holmes is not only a fanciful weirdo, he’s also a hypocrite about it. No wonder Watson thinks he’s piles of fun to be around. Seriously, I mean that completely unironically — Watson must think he’s adorb. (I’m not even going to mention the part where he came up with the phrase “a study in scarlet.”)